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Malapropism, Melodrama

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Malapropism, Melodrama

Post  Admin on September 18th 2008, 12:58 pm

Malapropism: In French, mal a propos means out of place or inappropriate. This term applys to a phrase that a speaker believes or intends to mean one thing, but in fact means somthing different. Malapropisms have been used for centures to highlight ignorance or simply poke fun.
Dogberry (left) from Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing is one of literature's many characters who employs malapropism

Melodrama:

From Wikipedia
The word "melodrama" is a portmanteau word, formed by combining the words "melody" (from the Greek "melōidía", meaning "song") and "drama". In its original sense,melodrama refers to theatre in which music is used to increase the spectator's emotional response or to suggest character types. While this use of music is nearly ubiquitous in modern film, in a melodrama these musical cues will be used within a fairly rigid structure, and the characterizations will accordingly be somewhat one-dimensional: Heroes are unambiguously good, villains unambiguously bad, and musical cues upon entrance of either will be unambiguous in signaling these facts to the audience. In other words, a melodrama tends to be a formulaic production, with a clearly constructed world of connotations: a villain poses a threat, the hero escapes the threat (or rescues the heroine) and there is (generally) a happy ending.

However, the term is also used in a broader sense to refer to a play, film, or other work in which emotion is exaggerated and plot and action are emphasized in comparison to the more character-driven emphasis within a drama. Melodramas can also be distinguished from tragedy by the fact that they are open to having a happy ending, but this is not always the case
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